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How Procedural Modeling Can Change the Future

By Maria Lorena Lehman — Get more articles like this sent to your email HERE.

‍Image Credit: © Pixies | Pixabay

REDEFINING OF “HISTORY”

Most recently, I have been working with procedural modeling software to create very forward-thinking conceptual designs. This way of modeling objects, buildings, or even cities is quite interesting as it allows for a more rapid testing, experimentation, and prototyping of ideas. And when procedural modeling integrates sensory design methodologies, opportunity to achieve high level poetics can surface.

In computer terms, the word “history” takes on new meaning and function when it comes to procedural modeling – since history in this context becomes malleable. For this reason, design prototyping of more complex forms gets faster for designers. Yet, this means that designers need to simultaneously engage in even deeper design thinking. After all, how far can a designer push the limits of a procedural model to explore the solution to a design challenge? Quite far (when engaged in deep design thinking).

The following is an example…

IMAGINING PROCEDURAL BUILT ENVIRONMENTS

What if constructed buildings could be procedurally built? For example, a building would not be fixed and could be changed on-the-fly after being constructed. Of course, this would be a type of responsive environment – but it would be one with a malleable construction history. What if a room (already built) could have its windows changed (easily), like one would click a button in a software application? And could smart nanomaterials be a part of what makes these types of changeable environments realized?

While one may think the world of procedural buildings is far away, it still is quite beneficial to imagine such futures because this is where our design tools, like our design thinking, can lead. Be sure to see your design tools as more than just a way to show clients your idea. Think of your design tools as seeds to the future that your design thinking will water for them to grow and evolve. These tools hold keys to helping you innovate not only your own design work, but also your very vision for the future.

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what members are saying...
Maria: I came across your website through a reference in today's Architect Weekly ezine and am delighted I did. I'll bookmark your site and check back often. I read the first article and then the second and thirty minutes later realized how much time had passed. I've been practicing for thirty years and have always missed the stimulation of academia. I find each of your brief dissertations sort of like a day in design studio. Thanks for the inspiration.

Ron Ward
AI Group Design
I am excited to see you touch a vein of values in architecture, I have been chasing myself for years. Your depth of involvement in these very deep subjects is really beautiful and passionately dealt with and well written. Sound, color and value, shape, texture, scale, smell.... all definitive measures of the spaces we should be alert to. [...] I will savor the rest of your investigation of sensuality in architecture. I'm Glad I found you.

Dennis McLaughlin
McLaughlin Architect
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Maria Lorena Lehman is a visionary author, designer, and educator from the United States. Maria holds a Bachelor of Architecture with Honors from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a Master in Design with Distinction from Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

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